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Pat Robertson Cries 'Uncle' on GOP Impeachment Trial
'It's Over As Far As I'm Concerned' Says 700 Club TV Preacher

Bill Clinton Mentions Gay Rights in his State of the Union Speech

Compiled By GayToday

clinrbtdc.jpg - 9.36 K In a startling development, the Christian Coalition's Pat Robertson -- a longtime proponent of impeachment -- said Wednesday that the U.S. Senate should drop the proceedings and move on. In remarks broadcast on The 700 Club, Robertson said impeachment "is over."

"As far as I'm concerned, the matter of impeachment is over," Robertson said. "The Republicans gave him an absolute platform to talk to the American people. He hit a home run in his speech. Whatever happens to the agenda doesn't really matter. From a public relations standpoint, he's won.

"And the Republicans don't know how to be a majority. They think of themselves as a minority so they don't play the game the way the Democrats do and so that's too bad for them. But Clinton's won. They might as well dismiss this impeachment hearing and get on with something else, because it's over as far as I'm concerned."

Robertson has long advocated the impeachment of Clinton and has used the impeachment controversy for membership recruitment and fundraising. In a direct mail letter signed by Robertson and mailed in October, shortly before the 1998 election, Robertson made it clear that the Christian Coalition's primary goal was securing the impeachment of President Clinton.

"[The] Christian Coalition will use every grassroots tool we have at hand to rally Christians to this cause and awaken Congress to this demand," Robertson wrote, adding that the president has broken "God's commandments."

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People for the American Way

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More recently, Randy Tate, executive director of the Christian Coalition, has been quoted widely in various newspaper articles as advocating the resignation or impeachment of the President. Wednesday's comments by Robertson show that the Christian Coalition's aggressive lobbying campaign to remove a democratically elected president from office has failed.

"Randy Tate, phone home," said People For the American Way President Carole Shields. "Even Pat Robertson recognizes that it's time to move on. When the founder and chairman of the Christian Coalition and the President of People For the American Way agree on an issue of this magnitude, it is indeed time to end it in the Senate."
Transcript: Pat Robertson on The 700 Club

Anchor Lee Webb: "Did the President benefit from last night's speech? Apparently he did, Pat and Terry. Early approval ratings now at 76 percent."

Robertson: "Lee, as far as I'm concerned, the matter of impeachment is over. The Republicans gave him an absolute platform to talk to the American people. He hit a home run in his speech. Whatever happens to the agenda doesn't really matter. From a public relations standpoint, he's won. And the Republicans don't know how to be a majority. They think of themselves as a minority so they don't play the game the way the Democrats do and so that's too bad for them. But Clinton's won. They might as well dismiss this impeachment hearing and get on with something else, because it's over as far as I'm concerned.

"But what we didn't hear about in last night's speech is the serious problem facing America, that of sexual immorality. Homosexuality. Promiscuity. Adultery. It's a disgraceful trend that is tragically gaining wide acceptance and is eroding the foundation of our nation."
Lesbians & Gays in the State of the Union Speech

President Clinton made history Tuesday night by becoming the first President to discuss gay and lesbian issues in a State of the Union address. Clinton's inclusive call to end discrimination and violence against gay and lesbian Americans should be applauded and could lend momentum to the passage of gay-supportive legislation in the 106th Congress, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

"President Clinton's call to end violence and discrimination against gay Americans is a testament to his long standing commitment to civil rights and was an act of bold leadership," said HRC Executive Director Elizabeth Birch.

"Establishing the passage of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act and the Hate Crimes Prevention Act as national priorities, reinvigorated momentum for both bills in the 106th Congress."
ebirch.gif - 5.61 K HRC's Elizabeth Birch

If passed by Congress, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment. Currently, race, religion, national origin, age, disability and gender are protected categories. In 1996, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act came within one vote of passing the Senate.


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